Sunday, April 01, 2007

Quick Reminder

Don't forget, the Eight Days of Agenting start tomorrow afternoon/evening, so keep suggesting topics. I need topics and questions, people! =)

(Also, alas, Jeff Strand, my client, did not win the Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a Novel. Stephen King did--and he was so disdainful of the whole thing that he didn't send or ask anyone to accept his award for him. It was funny, in a sad sad way.)

And now, off to get ready to fly back to the US soon. More on Canada later tonight! =) Sounds good, eh?

10 comments:

Kelly Swails said...

I suppose if you've won fifty million awards, getting one more is no big deal ...

I wonder what it must be like to be so jaded.

BernardL said...

Having read the travails Stephen King went through before he actually started earning a living wage writing, I can understand why he'd be a little uncaring about accolades from his former torturers. :)

Jodi Meadows said...

That *is* sad. Mebbe next time the award people will know better and give it to Jeff like they should have in the first place. *sniff*

Scott said...

A couple of agenting topics:

What kinds of things are you sick of seeing in your submission pile? What stands out in a query, good and bad?

Kathie said...

Sorry that you two are heading home empty-handed. Still, the nomination is tremendous.
Agent topic: When you come across a book that's "small and quiet" but very good, how do you decide to go ahead with it or not? What makes you think small and quiet might be just what's needed out there at a given time?

December Quinn said...

So sorry he didnt win...he'll get 'em next time!

Kimber An said...

Here's a question: How closely do you work with Ms. Perkins? Do you have to consult her on your choices and plans? Do you communicate with her daily or just check in? Do your clients only work with you?

David said...

BernardL,

These aren't his former torturers. The Bram Stoker Award is voted on by the members of the Horror Writers Association, which means people like me. We're King's fellow sufferers.

Jeff is a much funnier guy than King, but it's hard to overcome that fame factor, I guess.

EGP said...

This question is somewhat specific to my genre, but here goes. I have a conspiracy thriller (Robert Ludlum genre), and despite finding 200 agents that are accepting quries and will consider thrillers, very few seem to have sold or be interested in the political or conspiracy type of thriller. I took a trip through the local B&N and found many such books published in the past few years. In most cases, where the acknowledgement pages mentioned an agent, it was someone who didn't accept unsolicited queries.
I'm wondering if there are certain fiction genres that sell very well, but which agents going through the slush pile of unpublished authors generally don't feel they can sell and therefore don't look for. I'm planning on querying widely, of course (starting this week in fact), and I believe if my book is saleable, that I will find an agent. But I have had difficulty narrowing down my list based on prior sales, and wondered if I am not alone.

December Quinn said...

I'd like to hear abut career management. How do you handle writers who work in more than one genre (paranormal and historical, say) or medium (print and epub)? How do you help an author choose their next idea, or do you? How often do you speak with them or email them on average--do you call/email them to check on the progress of books, or if you haven't heard from them in x amount of time?

I'm sure you work differently with different people, but if you have any generalities to share that would be really interesting.